© 2004 Ahimsa Art by Mico Di Arpo

And So It Is: A look into the future of Buon Fresco

I have spent the better part of the last twenty years studying, practicing, learning, researching and perfecting some of the most ancient techniques in art. It is inevitable that such an endeavor would bring anyone into an intimate encounter with the sacred imagery of past masters. Regardless of the cause of work, (who commissioned such art), the effect is based in the spirituality of the artists that executed it. It would be difficult if not impossible for an artist to authentically capture and project an emotion or story they did not understand. Ultimately, anyone who has a desire to master these ancient techniques will inevitably be effected by this to some degree. This is not to say that the artists who choose to work in these mediums are destined to create sacred art. Diego Rivera is an example of this, although the influence of the old masters is evident, his frescoes would not be considered sacred in the literal sense. However, as with all things, the evolution of an art form requires movement. Iconography and panel painting are indeed in constant practice. Artists are using these mediums to create and communicate contemporary ideas insuring their place in today's art world. Although there are many artists working in fresco, the physical labor, technical knowledge and time restraints are definable factors in its slower progression into the contemporary art world. Fresco also needs to overcome the artists who attach its name to fake and/or unstable mediums meant to deceive the public. Fortunately this has caused true fresco artists to shift their energies to include education and public access. Giving lectures and demonstrations, aggressive show schedules with museums and galleries and teaching fresco technique has assisted a revival in scholastic and public venues that seem to be picking up momentum. It may be a slow process but I believe there is a place in contemporary art for this amazingly beautiful medium to shine.